Oscar Gowns

It’s happening.  This blog will temporarily be concerned with fashion, something I never thought it would be concerned with (I am strictly a v-neck and jeans girl).  But as I have obnoxiously strong opinions concerning the Academy Awards in general, and as said opinions trickle down to include actress attire, I’m going for it.

In no particular order, here are my favorite Oscar dresses (from 2005-present, because 2005 was when I began watching religiously):

Vera Wang. I think part of the reason I love this dress so much is that Michelle simply looked so happy in it. She and Heath attended the ceremony together, they were smiling and laughing, and all was right in the world.

1950s Dior. Reese Witherspoon won best actress for Walk the Line in this dress.

Guy Laroche. I tend to think the simpler the better when it comes to evening gowns. I tend to think that surprising details keep a simple dress from being boring. I also tend to think that if you spend months training to be a boxer in Million Dollar Baby, you deserve to show off some skin.

Balenciaga. I remember a lot of people, mostly people more well-spoken in the fashion world than I, hated this dress. I think it’s perfect on her. The color is great and the bow in the back adds interest.

Jean Paul Gaultier. She won best actress in this dress as well. I see a trend here.

Badgley Mischka

Valentino. This is possibly my all-time favorite. The colors are lovely together, and the draping is exquisite.

Vintage Balmain. Maybe it does look a little like a wedding dress, but I’m going to let that go.

Elie Saab. The color makes this dress for me, although I’m not a fan of the slightly shredded-looking edges.

Elie Saab. It’s brave, I think, to wear a patterned evening gown, and this one reminds me of a Monet painting.

Lanvin. Once you get past the brillo pad material, this dress has a modern elegance to it that Natalie Portman pulls off perfectly, headband and all.

Armani Prive. It’s simple, it’s 60s, it’s fun. What more can you ask for?

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Life is Beautiful

Life is beautiful.

I’m a five job lady right now:  office work, research with prof., theatre volunteering, babysitting (or nannying I suppose, as it’s a regular schedule), and now, cat sitting.

Here’s what I love about living in Morris for the summer: I’m nannying for two philosophy professors, and cat sitting for a political science professor.  Furthermore, the political science professor told me she’s put in a good word for me to the Chancellor, who also has cats.  And a Rottweiler.

Here’s what else I love about Morris:  it’s ideal for bike travel.  I always suspected that cars are the ticket to freedom: they’re fast, they can go long distances without wearing out, and they’re safely enclosed.  I was wrong.  There’s just something about biking around, using your own steam to get to work or to the grocery store.  There’s something (forgive me) about the wind in your hair, the bugs in your nostrils, the burn in your calves that is utterly exhilerating.

Here’s the third thing I love about Morris: On my bike ride home, I was standing on the pedals, huffing up a hill, when two shadowed figures loomed in the twilight.  They were lurking in the middle of the sidewalk, and I didn’t have time to veer off.  Fearing that I was about to be mugged, and mentally clinging to Mac, who was sheltered in my backpack, I bravely hurtled forward.

And then I realized that the shadowed figures were two fellow juniors and English majors.

We spent the following twenty minutes discussing everything from Irish history, to street performing (look for us on YouTube.  Search “Yoko Ono Stomp”), to Natalie Portman.

Then I rode the rest of the way home, muttering “I think I can I think I can” all the way up the last big hill.  And I thought about the fact that I worked nine hours today (split between three jobs), and that somehow, the best endings always close the longest days.

Life is beautiful, friends.  Enjoy it.

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

If there’s anything I love more than movies, it is the people who act in them.  Yes, I adore my celebrities.  I track them on Twitter, I see what their upcoming projects are on IMDB, I laugh at their failings in US Magazine.  But mostly, I wait all year for the Academy Awards, where all my favorite people come together to wear gorgeous clothes, to drink large quantities of champagne without shame, and to receive deserved (and undeserved) awards for their craft.  I love to see actors as themselves.  I love that Julia Roberts is left-handed (she faked it in Erin Brockovich because the real woman is a righty).  I love that Natalie Portman makes dirty jokes and Nicole Kidman is from Australia (which I realize after 10 minutes of “where did this accent come from?”).  I love that half of them can’t figure out which side of the stage to exit on, even though they’ve been watching people up there ALL NIGHT.

I love how giddy everyone is, how wide a berth Meryl Streep is given as she sashays down the red carpet in a bubble of touchmenoti’vebeenwinningOscarssincebeforeyouwereborn.  I love it when Ryan Seacrest practically has to beg to get an actor to come and talk to him.  I love when they ignore him and continue posing for the press.  I love the transparent jokes he makes to hide the fact that he just got the cold shoulder.

I love this:

And this:

And this:

And this:

And this:

And I think this is hilarious:

Stay gold, everyone.  And if you don’t, make a quick exit to the powder room, because the cameras will be on you.