What I’ll Read When I Have Time

So far the Marble Memo keeping is going well, thank you.  I only have a few pages filled, but I think it’ll take me a while to get used to thinking in terms of the notebook.  It took me a while to get used to thinking in terms of a blog.  You know, in days gone by, when I drove around the gas station three times because I forgot which side of the truck the tank was on, or when I slipped playing broomball and concussed myself, I would just think, “Wow, that’s unfortunate.”  But now, I think, “Wow, this’ll make for a great post.”

Eventually, beyond merely listening to people talk or observing something unique, I’ll learn to write down what I see and hear.

In other news, I have some richness in my bookshelf that I’d like to share with you.  As much as I’m dreading graduation because it means the end of college (yes, Dad, I went to the resume-writing workshop today.  And yes, I know what J-O-B spells), I’m also looking forward to reveling in delicious books every evening.  I’ve spent the last four years (well, really the last twenty-two, but the last four especially) amassing piles and piles of books that I haven’t had time to read yet.  Here are the ones I plan to devour first (and yes, I seem to associate books with eating…):

1. The White Forest, by Adam McOmber.  I met him!  I met him!  He was at the Literary Festival, and I had the honor of taking a workshop with him, and of introducing him later when he gave a reading.  I gave a rather creepy introduction, referencing last Spring, when he Google chatted with my fiction writing class.  People laughed, but honestly, it was creepy.  He came up to me afterward to say thank you, which was nice.  And he signed my book, which was awfully nice.  

2. Coop, by Michael Perry.  I swear I’m not deliberately plugging the Lit Fest, but Michael Perry was one of the authors last year.  I also took a workshop with him, but didn’t get a book signed because I was too cheap to pay full price, and opted for Amazon instead.

3. Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace.  A friend gave it to me for my birthday, with a nice inscription citing a George W. Bush quote.  Can’t beat that.

4. One the Road, by Jack Kerouac.  Also a birthday present.  Boy, people know me well.

5. Les Miserables, by Victor Hugo.  NOT BECAUSE OF THE MOVIE.  I’m way more hipster than that.  No, seriously.  I’ve been meaning to read it for years.

6. Three Cups of Tea, by David Oliver Relin.  Various family members have been telling me about this book for quite some time now.  Also, I met David sophomore year, when he spoke on campus … I am so sorry about all this name dropping, you guys.  But it makes sense, right?  That I’d want to read books written by people I’ve actually had contact with? 

7. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott.  For the zillionth time.  But now I own the Penguin Threads edition, which is just about the prettiest book edition I’ve ever seen.

Rachel Sumpter Penguin Threads Little Women cover

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This is What I Do in my Spare Time

I watch movie trailers.  And then I speculate about them.  I also stay up until 5 am studying for midterms.  And then I have a breakdown in the middle of the Student Center.

Actually, that one hasn’t happened yet.

Anyway, these are the movies I am currently engrossed in:

1. Hitchcock.  I saw this for the first time last night, and it immediately became apparent that Anthony Hopkins will win an Oscar.  He just will.  Watch it and you’ll see.  I mean, DDL looks great as Lincoln, and PSH, though everything he does creeps the heck out of me, will surely be nominated for The Master, but Hopkins is transcendent.  Utterly transcendent.

2. Les Miserables. I know I’ve already talked about this film, but the fact that the singing will not be dubbed is worth mentioning.  Entire movies have been spoiled for me because I’ve discovered ahead of time that an actor was wearing a wig, or a fat suit, or lifts.  As much as  it’s important for one to be able to lose oneself in a film, the illusion is always very delicate, in my opinion.  Real live singing will help immensely.

3. Wuthering Heights.  You see, this is my favorite Bronte novel.  Jane Eyre didn’t do anything for me, but Wuthering Heights is visceral and dark and fascinating.  I’m not sure what I think of the look of the film yet.  The twangy music is an interesting choice, although for me it conjures up Civil War, not English moors. (sorry about the rhyme)

4. Identity Thief.  I’m picky about comedies.  I suppose most people are.  The last comedy, however, that had me crying tears of mirth was Bridesmaids.  So naturally, if Melissa McCarthy is finally getting a lead comedic role, I’m on board.

5. Stoker.

Promising Trailers

Dear Friends,

Because it’s Sunday night, and we’re under a heat advisory (apparently that can happen in Minnesota), and I have to get up for work tomorrow, and I’m feeling fairly movie-deprived, here are the not-yet-debuted films I’m most looking forward to (minus the ones I’ve already blogged about: Anna Karenina, Ruby Sparks, etc.):

I would never have thought to cast Bill Murray as Franklin Roosevelt, but now that it’s been done, I think it’s genius.  And Laura Linney has been fantastic in everything I’ve seen.  I have high hopes.

The book was one of the most poignant teen fictions I’ve ever read, although I have doubts about a movie’s ability to capture the ‘infinite’ the book describes so well.  I think this film could easily slip into heartwarming, which would not be right.  We’ll see, though.

No explanation needed.

Oh man, I need to read this book.  I tried last summer, but didn’t get more than fifty pages in.  Also: what a talented cast they’ve chosen.

So very excited.